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C O N G R A T U L A T I O N S

to the parish’s first communicants who received the sacrament of the Lord’s Body and Blood on Saturday, April 30! We are happy to welcome you to God’s table at St. Stanislaus. 

 

 

We honor our Blessed Mother with the annual May crowning, will take place at the 11am Mass on Sunday, May 1. Mater dei, ora pro nobis (Mother of God, pray for us)!


The Council of Jerusalem, the Advocate, and Pastoral Strategy

Sixth Sunday of Easter, Year C – May1, 2016

Authored by Fr. Thomas M. Rosica, CSB, Salt & Light Media Foundation

paracleteThe early Church community in Jerusalem was not without its problems! Several of the controversies are evident in today’s first reading from Chapter 15 of the Acts of the Apostles.

When some of the converted Pharisees of Jerusalem discover the results of the first missionary journey of Paul (15:1-5), they urge that the Gentiles be taught to follow the Mosaic Law. Recognizing the authority of the Church in Jerusalem, Paul and Barnabas go there to settle the question of whether Gentiles can embrace a form of Christianity that does not include this obligation. The Council of Jerusalem (Acts 15:1-35) marks the official rejection of the rigid view that Gentile converts were obliged to observe the Mosaic Law completely. From here to the end of the book of Acts, Paul and the Gentile mission become the focus of Luke’s writing.

Early Church controversies

If the Gentiles are to become Christian, does that imply they must observe the customs of the Jewish converts to Christianity? This would mean imposing circumcision, dietary restrictions, and marriage regulations. The scene from today’s first reading not only presents us with one of the first great controversies of the Early Church, but also gives us some excellent insights into our own understanding of tradition and continuity, and the resolution of conflicts in the Church.

In the reading from the Book of Acts, some unauthorized members of the Jerusalem Church tried to insist upon circumcision as a necessity for salvation within the church at Antioch. The classical problem of the Early Church revolved around the necessity of the Mosaic Law for salvation. Jesus certainly kept it perfectly, from his birth, for he was circumcised on the eighth day (Luke 2:21) and he never annulled the force of the Mosaic Law. In fact he states quite clearly: “Do not think I have come to abolish the law and the prophets. I have come, not to abolish them, but to fulfil them” (Matthew 5:17). Yet Peter on the impulse of the Spirit, had baptized the household of the Roman centurion Cornelius without requiring circumcision.

The Apostles and elders gathered for deliberation and came to an agreement with the Mother Church at Jerusalem that the Mosaic laws were not to be required, nor the many traditions of the rabbis. The converts, out of courtesy, were asked not to partake of blood, nor of animals improperly slaughtered without draining the blood, nor of strangled animals for the same reason, nor of marriages within certain blood bonds.

Tradition and history

The Council of Jerusalem therefore settled a doctrinal issue about circumcision and the Mosaic Law, but did it in a way that preserved peace. This is a very good model for handling questions of tradition, continuity, and conflict today. Both the theological issues and the feelings of people are very important. Peter and Paul show a remarkable respect for the manifestation of the Holy Spirit in the lives of ordinary people and situations. Even when the Spirit seemed to shatter the sacred traditions that existed for centuries, Peter and Paul knew that the Holy Spirit was not bound by tradition and history.

Neither Peter nor Paul were afraid of taking their cases and questions to the leaders of the whole Church. Through prayer, fasting, consultation, and voting, decisions are made. Underlying all of this is the desire to preserve peace at all costs, without compromising on principles and human rights. After all, Jesus’ farewell gift to the Church is peace, not division and discord. Our judgments and decisions must lead us and all future generations to our final goal, the New Jerusalem established on earth, the reign of justice, joy, and peace among us.

Defense attorney

Today’s Gospel reading (John 14:23-29) reminds us that those who encounter Christ and enter into a friendly relationship with him welcome into their hearts Trinitarian Communion itself, in accordance with Jesus’ promise to his disciples: “If a man loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him” (14:23).

In John 14:16 Jesus says that he will send “another Advocate” to be on our side. John uses the Greek word parakletos, which literally means “one called alongside,” and a standard use of the term is for one called alongside to help in a legal situation as a defense attorney. There is a legal tone to some of what Jesus says about the Advocate, yet the picture is more exactly that of a prosecuting attorney.

Jesus himself is going to be crucified and die; in the eyes of the world he will be judged, found guilty, and convicted. Yet after his death, the “paraclete” will come forward and reverse the sentence by convicting the world and providing Jesus’ innocence (16:8-11).

Jesus was our first Advocate with the Father. The new Advocate is not a kind of a proxy sent to replace the absent Lord: on the contrary, it assures his presence as well as the Father’s. They will “come to” the one who remains faithful to Jesus’ word, and they will dwell “with” him. Not with the others – those who do not love the Lord and do not keep his word.

The Paraclete dwells in everyone who loves Jesus and keeps the commandments, and so his presence is not limited by time (14:15-17). This may be the way in which the coming of the Paraclete is “better.” These words of Jesus about the Paraclete illustrate beautifully how the audience to which he speaks at the Last Supper extends beyond those present at that moment in history. Jesus’ words are also addressed to us today.

The Paraclete is just as present in the modern disciples of Jesus as he was in the first generation. No one should think that Jesus has abandoned his Church in our times. He continues to send us God’s Spirit of Truth. We are told in the Gospel that the “one whom the Father will send will teach us everything, and remind us of all that Jesus has said to us” (14:26). This reminding or calling to memory is beautifully expressed in a new term used in the Catechism of the Catholic Church to describe the work of the paraclete: “The Holy Spirit is the Church’s living memory” (#1099). The Holy Spirit will increase our gifts to the extent that we love Jesus and our brothers and sisters, dwell in his Word, obey the commandments, and generously share with others what we have so freely received.

A model

The Council of Jerusalem left us a model for dealing with difficult situations in the Church. Both the theological issues and the feelings of people were very important for the Apostles. Even when the Spirit seemed to shatter the sacred traditions that existed for centuries, Peter and Paul knew that the Holy Spirit was not bound by tradition and history. May we who follow in that same tradition and history be ever open to the working of the Spirit in our day, and in so doing be agents of the Advocate for the Church and the world.

The readings for the 6th Sunday of Easter are: The readings for this Sunday are: Acts 15:1-2,22-29; Revelation 21:10-14,22-23; and John 14:23-29]

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Formed.org is a vehicle for those interested in learning more about their Catholic faith to do so via on-line at any time that is convenient for YOU.

FORMED is a gateway to the best Catholic teaching videos, books and audio talks to deepen your relationship with Christ and His Church.

How to access Formed:

It’s easy! Log into Formed.org and access all the faith-building resources available there. You will need to set up an account (click on “My Account” in the upper right) and enter the Parish Code the first time you use the site. Our parish code is: ZR6M2C.  After you’ve set up an account with your own individual password, you will not need the parish code any longer. Simply log in with the User Name and Password  you have chosen for yourself.

What’s * * NEW * * on the site?

DivMrcy1Renowned speaker and author Fr. Michael Gaitley tells the dramatic history of God’s Love and Mercy as interwoven through the transformative message of St. Faustina, the miraculous appearance of Mary at Fatima, the witness of Maximilian Kolbe, and the world-changing papacy of Pope St. John Paul II. Featuring the brilliant cinematic artistry of the Augustine Institute’s film studio, the vast panorama of God’s work of mercy in the world unfolds as a story to be experienced.

Episodes will be available for a limited time on FORMED.org as a special event beginning on Divine Mercy Sunday, April 3rd! Each video will be placed sequentially on FORMED – one episode each week until the end of June. Each episode will be viewable for two weeks. 

Check it out . . . and get FORMED.


 

2016 CATHOLIC CHARITIES APPEAL

Click on the headline above to read the Press Release!

This year’s Appeal answers Pope Francis’ call to serve those in need with an expanded vision and increased goal


Pope Francis’ Prayer Intentions for April, 2016:

Pope’s prayer intention for April: for small farmers to receive just compensation for their invaluable work.


 

Year of Mercy: December 8th, 2015 – November 20th, 2016

Pope Francis has called for an extraordinary Jubilee to encourage us to become more effective witnesses of God’s merciful love. The Year of Mercy began on December 8, 2015 and continues until November 20, 2016. Pope Francis has encouraged the Church to make its mission be a witness of mercy to all people.

“At times we are called to gaze even more attentively on mercy so that we may become a more effective sign of the

Father’s action in our lives. For this reason I have proclaimed an Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy as a special time

for the church; a time when the witness of believers might grow stronger and more effective.”

The Holy Father discusses mercy and his desires for the jubilee year in a document called Misericordiae Vultus, the official proclamation of the Year of Mercy. Follow the link to read the original text from the Vatican’s web site. How will YOU celebrate the Jubilee? The Pope asks each of us to celebrate by showing to others the mercy that God constantly extends to all of us. We can do the following concrete things to make this year spiritually fruitful:

  • Contemplate Mercy in order to see how God gives Himself to us and asks nothing in return;
  • Be attentive to the judgments and condemnations you make of others. We only see the surface actions; God sees the heart. Accept the good in every person;
  • Forgive! Is anyone less worthy of forgiveness than ourselves? Forgiveness is an act of mercy not just for the person who impacted us badly but also for ourselves as well;
  • Listen to/Study God’s Word. God is a God of mercy who mediates that throughout the pages of the bible.;
  • Go on Pilgrimage to a Holy Door in our Archdiocese. The closest one to St. Stanislaus is located at the Polish Shrine of Our Lady in the Doylestown fringes;
  • Recognize the need for mercy in the world, to the people of the world, especially the poor. Treat everyone with dignity and offer friendship;
  • Practice the “Works of Mercy.” Can’t remember them? They are etched into the windows of St. Stanislaus Church;
  • Ask God to change your heart so that God’s mercy can pour out to others through our hands, words, and actions.

 Prayer of Pope Francis for the Jubilee

Lord Jesus Christ,
you have taught us to be merciful like the heavenly Father,
and have told us that whoever sees you sees Him.
Show us your face and we will be saved.
Your loving gaze freed Zacchaeus and Matthew from being enslaved by money;
the adulteress and Magdalene from seeking happiness only in created things;
made Peter weep after his betrayal,
and assured Paradise to the repentant thief.
Let us hear, as if addressed to each one of us, the words that you spoke to the Samaritan woman:
“If you knew the gift of God!”
 
You are the visible face of the invisible Father,
of the God who manifests his power above all by forgiveness and mercy:
let the Church be your visible face in the world, its Lord risen and glorified.
You willed that your ministers would also be clothed in weakness
in order that they may feel compassion for those in ignorance and error:
let everyone who approaches them feel sought after, loved, and forgiven by God.
 
Send your Spirit and consecrate every one of us with its anointing,
so that the Jubilee of Mercy may be a year of grace from the Lord,
and your Church, with renewed enthusiasm, may bring good news to the poor,
proclaim liberty to captives and the oppressed,
and restore sight to the blind.  
 
We ask this through the intercession of Mary, Mother of Mercy,
you who live and reign with the Father and the Holy Spirit for ever and ever.
Amen.